CenterPoint 4-16x40AO Scope Review

Typically I don’t search for scopes that are in the sub one hundred dollar range.  In just about all cases, you get what you pay for.  However, when trying to outfit a new springer air rifle, this scope came to my attention.  It had the power range I was looking for, adjustable objective, and a ranging reticle.  Unknowingly, this optic is produced by the air rifle company Crosman.   Honestly, I’m quite surprised with its overall value for what the scope offers.  Let’s dig in a little deeper.

 

Scope Appearance:

Right out of the clam-shell packaging the scope has a smooth, matte finish.  I couldn’t detect any flaws or imperfections in the coating.  The adjustable objective, magnification ring, and illuminated reticle actuator are all clearly mark and easy to read.  As a bonus, if you are wanting to attach this to a centerfire rifle it comes with rings ready to attach to weaver-style bases.  Instructions, a cleaning cloth, and a 2032 battery are supplied in the clam-shell packaging.

 

Glass/Clarity:

Usually scopes in the sub $100 category tend to suffer in the glass department.  Strike me as surprised when I first looked through this scope.  The lower range was both bright and clear.  The upper range on slightly showed signs of less light gathering, along with a tighter eye relief.  I expected the higher range to be much worse than it actually was.  It’s certainly not in the Nikon EFR category of glass, but it’s a budget option that’s very versatile given the power range and options.

 

Adjustments:

 If there are any downfalls with this scope it’s in this department.  The magnification ring is pretty smooth, but lacks any traction if you really need to get a grip on it.  It’s also blocked by the odd placement of the IR actuator.  It’s a little more than cumbersome to crank on the mag wheel with the IR actuator sticking up on the rear ocular.  You can get past this annoyance, but it’s just that, annoying!  The adjustable objective rotates smoothly and I find is somewhat closely calibrated to its yardage markings.  It will focus down as low as ten yards, and is mandatory for me for rimfire rifles.  Another area that could use attention is the turrets.  The covers must take twenty revolutions to remove them.  Five to six revolutions should be more than enough….  The turrets are basically what I’ve come to expect on a scope at this price level.  They are rough to the touch, deeply recessed in the turret housing, but do manage to be finger adjustable.  One quarter inch adjustments at 100 yards, which is typical of most optics on the market.  Centerpoint certainly got one thing right, the turrets are both audible and tactile.  It’s a peeve of mine that turrets don’t have a defined “click” that you can both hear and feel.  The IR actuator works exactly as it should and has both green and red options with five different brightness levels.  Lastly, this optic comes with a fast focus eye piece.  Wow, for under one hundred bucks it comes with this feature!!  I have scopes that are triple the cost of this one without that feature.  Nice touch Centerpoint.

Ring Height:

No surprise here, I picked BKL-257mb medium rings for attachment to my springer air rifle.  These rings make attaching a scope to just about any dovetail rail a simple process.  BKL’s are lightweight aluminum, cost effective, and just flat work.

 

Reticle:

When I’m searching for a scope for squirrels or pests, I’m always looking for one with a ranging reticle.  I prefer mildot, but not every scope manufacturer offers that option.  The CenterPoint comes with what they’ve branded as the TAG reticle.  In simple terms its a BDC (ballistic drop compensating) type reticle.  It can be used for holdovers on a rimfire or pellet rifle, which helped when deciding to evaluate this scope.  The crosshairs are thin enough for smaller targets, and the “triangle” style mils are small enough to not obscure longer distance shots at game.  No markings exist for windage holds with the TAG reticle.  

 

 

Manufacturer Specs:

A downside to this one inch tubed scope, is that it weighs in at just over 20 ounces.  That extra heft can take away from a rifle like a Ruger 10/22 or a Marlin model 60, which are known for how lightweight they are.

SKU LR416AORG2
MAGNIFICATION 4 – 16x
EYE RELIEF (IN) 70-80
OBJECTIVE 40 mm
EXIT PUPIL 8.0 – 2.4
TURRET CAPS Yes
NITROGEN PURGED Yes
FOCAL PLANE 2nd
FIELD OF VIEW 12.8-3.6
TURRET ADJUSTMENTS Finger
VARIABLE ILLUMINATION 0-5 Steps
RETICLE ILLUMINATION Red / Green
RETICLE MATERIAL Metal
WINDAGE +/-25
PARALLAX ADJUSTMENT AO
PARALLAX 10 yards – Infinity
LENS COATING Multi-Coated
BATTERY TYPE CR2032

 

Based on my evaluation thus far the positives outweigh the negatives with the Centerpoint 4-16x40AO scope.  If you are searching for a budget optic with increased magnification, I believe this is money well spent.  Time will tell if it can endure the punishment of a springer air rifle, but per manufacturer specs it’s built for just that purpose.  It should do very nicely, though, on your favorite rimfire rifle.

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